Top 10 Benefits of Vitamin E for Hair and Skin

Vitamin E is a powerful, fat-soluble antioxidant that can rejuvenate your health as well as beauty. It encompasses a group of eight compounds that include both tocopherols and tocotrienols. It works as an immune booster, promotes good circulation, regulates blood sugar, keeps your heart healthy, prevents stroke-induced brain damage and protects against certain cancers. Here are the top 10 benefits of vitamin E for hair and skin…

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Best Vitamins for Acne Prone Skin 2017

Vitamin E For Acne: Does Vitamin E Help Acne?

The role that vitamin E plays in acne treatment is that it reduces the appearance of marks left behind. It also helps skin cells heal themselves. It is one of the vitamins for acne that is critical to the healing process. Vitamin E also helps balance the production of skin proteins such as elastin and collagen. It increases keratin formation and helps protect follicles from damage.

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Using vitamin E to prevent the impairment in behavioral test, cell loss and dendrite changes in medial prefrontal cortex induced by tartrazine in rats.

Rafati A, Nourzei N, Karbalay-Doust S, Noorafshan A.

Acta Histochem. 2017 Mar;119(2):172-180. doi: 10.1016/j.acthis.2017.01.004. Epub 2017 Jan 23.

Abstract

Tartrazine is a food color that may adversely affect the nervous system. Vitamin E is a neuro-protective agent. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of tartrazine and vitamin E on the performance of rats in memory and learning tests as well as the structure of medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC). The rats were first divided into seven groups which received the followings for a period of seven weeks: distilled water, corn oil, vitamin E (100mg/kg/day), a low dose (50mg/kg/day) and a high dose (50mg/kg/day) of tartrazine with and without vitamin E. Behavioral tests were conducted and the brain was extracted for stereological methods The high dose of tartrazine decreased the exploration time of novel objects (P<0.01). The low and high doses of tartrazine led into an increase in working and reference memory errors in acquisition and retention phases (eight-arm radial maze) compared to distilled water group (P<0.01). Additionally, the high dose of tartrazine induced a reduction in the volume of mPFC (∼13%) and its subdivision. Not only that, but the number of neurons and glial cells (∼14%) as well as the mushroom and thin spines per dendrite length declined. The length of dendrites per neuron also reduced in comparison to the distilled water group (P<0.01). Nonetheless, concomitant treatment of the rats with vitamin E plus tartrazine prevented the above-mentioned changes. An acceptable daily dose of tartrazine could induce impairment in spatial memory and dendrite structure. Moreover, a high dose of tartrazine may defect the visual memory, mPFC structure, the spatial memory and also cause dendrite changes. Vitamin E could prevent the behavioral and structural changes.

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Association of dietary vitamin E intake with risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.

Zhu YJ, Bo YC, Liu XX, Qiu CG.

Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2017 Mar;26(2):271-277. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.032016.04.

Abstract

Several epidemiological studies investigating the association between dietary vitamin E intake and the risk of lung cancer have demonstrated inconsistent results. Hence, a meta-analysis was conducted to summarise evidence of the association of dietary vitamin E intake with the risk of lung cancer. In this meta-analysis, a systematic literature search of PubMed and Web of Science was conducted to identify relevant studies published from 1955 to April 2015. If p<0.05 or I2 >50%, a random effect model was used to estimate overall relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Otherwise, a fixed effect model was applied. Publication bias was estimated using the funnel plot and Egger’s test. The doseresponse relationship was assessed using the method of restricted cubic splines with 4 knots at percentiles 5, 35, 65, and 95 of the distribution. The pooled RR of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of dietary vitamin E intake was 0.84 (95% CI=0.76-0.93). With every 2 mg/d increase in dietary vitamin E intake, the risk of lung cancer statistically decreased by 5% (RR=0.95, 95% CI =0.91-0.99, plinearity=0.0237). Our analysis suggests that higher dietary vitamin E intake exerts a protective effect against lung cancer.

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Vitamin E-coated dialysis membranes reduce the levels of oxidative genetic damage in hemodialysis patients.

Rodríguez-Ribera L, Corredor Z, Silva I, Díaz JM, Ballarín J, Marcos R, Pastor S, Coll E.

utat Res. 2017 Mar;815:16-21. doi: 10.1016/j.mrgentox.2017.01.003. Epub 2017 Feb 3.

Abstract

End-stage renal disease patients present oxidative stress status that increases when they are submitted to hemodialysis (HD). This increase in oxidative stress can affect their genetic material, among other targets. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of using polysulfone membranes coated with vitamin E, during the HD sessions, on the levels of genetic damage of HD patients. Forty-six patients were followed for 6 months, of whom 29 changed from conventional HD to the use of membranes coated with vitamin E. The level of genetic damage was measured using the micronucleus and the comet assays, both before and after the follow-up period. Serum vitamin E concentration was also checked. The obtained results showed that 24% of our patients presented vitamin E deficiency, and this was normalized in those patients treated with vitamin E-coated membranes. Patients with vitamin E deficiency showed higher levels of oxidative DNA damage. After the use of vitamin E-coated membranes we detected a significant decrease in the levels of oxidative damage. Additionally, hemoglobin values increased significantly with the use of vitamin E-coated membranes. In conclusion, the use of vitamin E-coated membranes supposes a decrease on the levels of oxidative DNA damage, and improves the uremic anemia status. Furthermore, the use of this type of membrane was also effective in correcting vitamin E deficiency.

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Inhibitory Effects of γ- and δ-Tocopherols on Estrogen-Stimulated Breast Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

Bak MJ, Das Gupta S, Wahler J, Lee HJ, Li X, Lee MJ, Yang CS, Suh N.

Cancer Prev Res (Phila). 2017 Mar;10(3):188-197. doi: 10.1158/1940-6207.CAPR-16-0223. Epub 2017 Jan 17.

Abstract

Estrogens have been implicated as complete carcinogens for breast and other tissues through mechanisms involving increased cell proliferation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. Because of their potent antioxidant activity and other effects, tocopherols have been shown to exert antitumor activities in various cancers. However, limited information is available on the effect of different forms of tocopherols in estrogen-mediated breast cancer. To address this, we examined the effects of α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherols as well as a natural γ-tocopherol-rich mixture of tocopherols, γ-TmT, on estrogen-stimulated MCF-7 cells in vitro and in vivo For the in vivo studies, MCF-7 cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice previously implanted with estrogen pellets. Mice were then administered diets containing 0.2% α-, γ-, δ-tocopherol, or γ-TmT for 5 weeks. Treatment with α-, γ-, δ-tocopherols, and γ-TmT reduced tumor volumes by 29% (P < 0.05), 45% (P < 0.05), 41% (P < 0.05), and 58% (P < 0.01), as well as tumor weights by 20%, 37% (P < 0.05), 39% (P < 0.05), and 52% (P < 0.05), respectively. γ- and δ-tocopherols and γ-TmT inhibited the expression of cell proliferation-related genes such as cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and estrogen-related genes such as TFF/pS2, cathepsin D, and progesterone receptor in estrogen-stimulated MCF-7 cells in vitro Further, γ- and δ-tocopherols decreased the levels of estrogen-induced oxidative stress and nitrosative stress markers, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and nitrotyrosine, as well as the DNA damage marker, γ-H2AX. Our results suggest that γ- and δ-tocopherols and the γ-tocopherol-rich mixture are effective natural agents for the prevention and treatment of estrogen-mediated breast cancer.

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Reduction of oxidative-nitrosative stress underlies anticataract effect of topically applied tocotrienol in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

Abdul Nasir NA, Agarwal R, Sheikh Abdul Kadir SH, Vasudevan S, Tripathy M, Iezhitsa I, Mohammad Daher A, Ibrahim MI, Mohd Ismail N.

PLoS One. 2017 Mar 28;12(3):e0174542. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0174542. eCollection 2017.

Abstract

Cataract, a leading cause of blindness, is of special concern in diabetics as it occurs at earlier onset. Polyol accumulation and increased oxidative-nitrosative stress in cataractogenesis are associated with NFκB activation, iNOS expression, ATP depletion, loss of ATPase functions, calpain activation and proteolysis of soluble to insoluble proteins. Tocotrienol was previously shown to reduce lens oxidative stress and inhibit cataractogenesis in galactose-fed rats. In current study, we investigated anticataract effects of topical tocotrienol and possible mechanisms involved in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Diabetic rats were treated with vehicle (DV) or tocotrienol (DT). A third group consists of normal, non-diabetic rats were treated with vehicle (NV). All treatments were given topically, bilaterally, twice daily for 8 weeks with weekly slit lamp monitoring. Subsequently, rats were euthanized and lenses were subjected to estimation of polyol accumulation, oxidative-nitrosative stress, NFκB activation, iNOS expression, ATP levels, ATPase activities, calpain activity and total protein levels. Cataract progression was delayed from the fifth week onwards in DT with lower mean of cataract stages compared to DV group (p<0.01) despite persistent hyperglycemia. Reduced cataractogenesis in DT group was accompanied with lower aldose reductase activity and sorbitol level compared to DV group (p<0.01). DT group also showed reduced NFκB activation, lower iNOS expression and reduced oxidative-nitrosative stress compared to DV group. Lenticular ATP and ATPase and calpain 2 activities in DT group were restored to normal. Consequently, soluble to insoluble protein ratio in DT group was higher compared to DV (p<0.05). In conclusion, preventive effect of topical tocotrienol on development of cataract in STZ-induced diabetic rats could be attributed to reduced lens aldose reductase activity, polyol levels and oxidative-nitrosative stress. These effects of tocotrienol invlove reduced NFκB activation, lower iNOS expression, restoration of ATP level, ATPase activities, calpain activity and lens protein levels.

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Home remedies to fade away stretch marks that work!

Vitamin E oil has amazing benefits for the skin. It is not only found in several anti-ageing lotions but is also really good for your hair. Vitamin E prevents the skin’s collagen from breaking and also prevents the appearance of stretch marks. Many lotions that prevent stretch marks and are used during pregnancy contain Vitamin E oil. However, it can also help lighten existing marks with regular use.

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Current and future pharmacologic treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

Banini BA, Sanyal AJ.

Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2017 Mar 24. doi: 10.1097/MOG.0000000000000356. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the aggressive form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer in 5-15% of patients and is rapidly becoming the leading cause for end-stage liver disease. Dietary caloric restriction and exercise, currently the cornerstone of therapy for NAFLD, can be difficult to achieve and maintain, underscoring the dire need for pharmacotherapy. This review presents the agents currently used in managing NAFLD and their pharmacologic targets. It also provides an overview of NAFLD agents currently under development. Therapies for NASH can be broadly classified into agents that target the metabolic perturbations driving disease pathogenesis (such as insulin resistance and de novo lipogenesis) and agents that target downstream processes including cell stress, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptors, farnesoid-X-receptors, and the glucagon-like peptide 1 pathway have been shown to improve liver histology. The intestinal microbiome and metabolic endotoxemia are novel targets that are currently under review. Antioxidants such as vitamin E, and more recently anti-inflammatory agents such as apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 inhibitors show promise as therapy for NASH. Several antifibrotic agents including cysteine-cysteine motif chemokine receptor type 2 and type 5 antagonists have been shown to inhibit the progression of fibrosis toward cirrhosis. There are currently several agents in the drug pipeline for NASH. Within the next few years, the availability of therapeutic options for NAFLD will hopefully curb the rising trend of NAFLD-related end stage liver disease.

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Is Vitamin E Actually Good for My Skin?

Is vitamin E actually good for our skin? Luckily, it appears that my years of blindly using vitamin E products weren’t a waste, as the compound actually does have a beneficial effect on our skin. On the one hand, it’s an anti-inflammatory, which means it can help prevent redness, puffiness, and other general inflammation in our skin. But on the other, its antioxidant properties also mean that it can help prevent signs of aging and wrinkles, Zeitlin explained. Dr. D’Adamo added that it can also help people get rid of scars.

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