Comparing Palm Oil, Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction and α-Tocopherol Supplementation on the Antioxidant Levels of Older Adults.

Nor Azman NHE, Goon JA, Abdul Ghani SM, Hamid Z, Wan Ngah WZ

Antioxidants (Basel). 2018 May 28;7(6). pii: E74. doi: 10.3390/antiox7060074.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tocotrienol and tocopherol are known to prevent numerous degenerative diseases. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) with α-tocopherol (α-TF) on the antioxidant status of healthy individuals aged between 50 and 55 years.

METHODS:

Volunteers were divided into groups receiving placebo (n = 23), α-TF (n = 24) and TRF (n = 24). Fasting venous blood samples were taken at baseline (0 month), 3 months and 6 months of supplementation for the determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities as well as for reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentrations.

RESULTS:

CAT and GPx were unaffected by TRF and α-TF supplementations. SOD activity increased significantly after six months of TRF supplementation. Analysis by gender showed that only female subjects had significant increases in SOD and GPx activities after six months of TRF supplementation. GPx activity was also significantly higher in females compared to males after six months of TRF supplementation. The GSH/GSSG ratio increased significantly after six months of TRF and α-TF supplementation in only the female subjects.

CONCLUSION:

TRF and α-TF supplementation exhibited similar effects to the antioxidant levels of older adults with TRF having more significant effects in females.

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COLUMNISTS- Which oil is best for you?

What is your favourite oil: coconut oil, groundnut oil, sunflower oil, flaxseed oil, olive oil? Regarding its health benefits, none of these oils can compare with Palm oil. Surprised? You are probably astonished because palm oil is everywhere and is cheaper than other oils. Remember that biblical saying: ‘A prophet is always respected except in his own country.’ Palm oil is a native of West Africa.

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Annatto Tocotrienol Improves Fatty Liver Index in Patients

Delta-tocotrienol from annatto decreased biomarkers associated with fatty liver, suggests a published clinical study in patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

A recent study conducted at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Pakistan, and published in the Turkish Journal of Gastroenterology, adds new data to a growing body of evidence that shows tocotrienol benefits for the liver.

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Proteome-wide changes in primary skin keratinocytes exposed to diesel particulate extract-A role for antioxidants in skin health

Rajagopalan P, Jain AP, Nanjappa V, Patel K, Mangalaparthi KK, Babu N, Cavusoglu N, Roy N, Soeur J, Breton L, Pandey A, Gowda H, Chatterjee A, Misra N

J Dermatol Sci. 2018 May 21. pii: S0923-1811(18)30215-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2018.05.003. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Skin acts as a protective barrier against direct contact with pollutants but inhalation and systemic exposure have indirect effect on keratinocytes. Exposure to diesel exhaust has been linked to increased oxidative stress.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate global proteomic alterations in diesel particulate extract (DPE)/its vapor exposed skin keratinocytes.

METHODS:

We employed Tandem Mass Tag (TMT)-based proteomics to study effect of DPE/DPE vapor on primary skin keratinocytes.

RESULTS:

We observed an increased expression of oxidative stress response protein NRF2, upon chronic exposure of primary keratinocytes to DPE/its vapor which includes volatile components such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics led to identification 4490 proteins of which 201 and 374 proteins were significantly dysregulated (≥1.5 fold, p ≤ 0.05) in each condition, respectively. Proteins involved in cellular processes such as cornification (cornifin A), wound healing (antileukoproteinase) and differentiation (suprabasin) were significantly downregulated in primary keratinocytes exposed to DPE/DPE vapor. These results were corroborated in 3D skin models chronically exposed to DPE/DPE vapor. Bioinformatics analyses indicate that DPE and its vapor affect distinct molecular processes in skin keratinocytes. Components of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation machinery were seen to be exclusively overexpressed upon chronic DPE vapor exposure. In addition, treatment with an antioxidant like vitamin E partially restores expression of proteins altered upon exposure to DPE/DPE vapor.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study highlights distinct adverse effects of chronic exposure to DPE/DPE vapor on skin keratinocytes and the potential role of vitamin E in alleviating adverse effects of environmental pollution.

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Effects of High-dose Vitamin E Supplementation on Markers of Cardiometabolic Risk and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: a Randomized Double-blinded Controlled Trial

Aghadavod E, Soleimani A, Hamidi G, Keneshlou F, Heidari A, Asemi Z

Iran J Kidney Dis. 2018 May;12(3):156-162.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) may benefit from vitamin E‘s antilipid and antioxidant activities. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of high-dose vitamin E supplementation on markers of cardiometabolic risk and oxidative stress in patients with DN.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This randomized controlled trial was carried out on 54 patients with DN that were randomly divided into 2 groups to receive vitamin E supplement (800 IU/d) or placebo for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples were obtained at baseline and after the 12-week intervention to determine markers of cardiometabolic risk and oxidative stress.

RESULTS:

Vitamin E supplementation, compared with the placebo, resulted in a significant reduction in serum total cholesterol (-14.3 ± 29.9 mg/dL versus -0.8 ± 13.1 mg/L, P = .03), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-16.4 ± 28.5 mg/dL versus 0.1 ± 17.2 mg/L, P = .01), and ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio (-0.5 ± 0.7 versus 0.1 ± 0.5, P = .001), and a significant elevation in vitamin Elevels (39.7 ± 12.4 nmol/mL versus -0.5 ± 1.3 nmol/mL, P < .001) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (1.4 ± 3.7 versus -2.1 ± 5.1 mg/L, P = .006). It also resulted in a significant elevation in plasma glutathione levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study demonstrated that high-dose vitamin E supplementation for 12 weeks had favorable effects on lipid profile and glutathione levels of patients with DN, except for triglycerides, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, nitric oxide, and total antioxidant capacity levels.

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What are the symptoms of low vitamin E?

The body needs vitamin E to function, making it an essential vitamin. It is fat-soluble, meaning that it requires fat from the diet to be properly absorbed. Vitamin E is mainly stored in the liver before being released into the blood stream for use.

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Vitamin E and its anticancer effects

Abraham A, Kattoor AJ, Saldeen T, Mehta JL.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2018 May 10:1-23. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2018.1474169. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin comprising of eight natural isoforms, namely, α, β, δ, γ isoforms of tocopherol and α, β, δ, γ isoforms of tocotrienol. Many studies have been performed to elucidate its role in cancer. Until last decade, major focus was on alpha tocopherol and its anticancer effects. However, major clinical trials using alpha-tocopherol like SELECT trial and ATBC trial did not yield meaningful results. Hence there was a shift of focus to gamma-tocopherol, delta-tocopherol and tocotrienol. Unlike alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and delta-tocopherol can scavenge reactive nitrogen species in addition to reactive oxygen species. Antiangiogenic effect, inhibition of HMG CoA reductase enzyme and inhibition of NF-κB pathway make the anti-cancer effects of tocotrienols unique compared to other vitamin E isoforms. Preclinical research on non-alpha tocopherol isoforms of vitamin E showed promising data on their anticancer effects. In this review, we deal with the current understanding on the potential mechanisms involved in the anticancer effects of vitamin E and the controversies in this field over last three decades. We also highlight the need to conduct further research on the anticancer effects of non-alpha-tocopherol isoforms in larger population and clinical setting.

KEYWORDS:

Vitamin E and cancer; anticancer mechanisms; tocopherol; tocopherol and cancer; tocotrienol

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Get to know tocotrienols: Your brain will thank you later!

You know that vitamin C helps boost your immune system, and vitamin A supports your vision. What if there were a naturally occurring letter vitamin that supports your brain health? Further, what if the federal government was pouring millions of dollars into researching the benefits of this vitamin? The good news is that it’s already readily available. It’s a form of natural vitamin E called tocotrienols.

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Effects of Carnosine and Vitamin E on Nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1, Ghrelin, Adropin, and Irisin in Experimentally Induced Ovarian Torsion

Sarac M, Bakal U, Kuloglu T, Tartar T, Aydin S, Yardim M, Artas G, Kazez A

Ann Clin Lab Sci. 2018 May;48(3):345-354.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Delay in the diagnosis of ovarian torsion leads to serious histopathological changes and many problems, including infertility. Various agents have been investigated to minimize detorsion-associated potential injury. This study was performed to study the effects of carnosine and vitamin E on tissue and serum expression of Nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1, ghrelin, adropin, and irisin to determine whether they have protective effects in cases of ovarian torsion.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

Seventy-eight rats were allocated evenly into 13 groups. All rats, excluding those in the control and sham groups and Groups (G) III, IV, and V, were subjected to ovarian torsion for 12 hours. The groups were designated as follows: G-I (control), G-II (sham), G-III (vitamin E), G-IV (carnosine), G-V (carnosine + vitamin E), G-VI (torsion), G-VII (torsion + detorsion), G-VIII (torsion + vitamin E), G-IX (torsion + carnosine), G-X (torsion + carnosine + vitamin E), G-XI (torsion + detorsion + vitamin E), G-XII (torsion + detorsion + carnosine), and G-XIII (torsion + detorsion + carnosine + vitamin E). Serum levels of NUCB2/nesfatin-1, ghrelin, adropin, and irisin were measured by ELISA. Immunohistochemical methods were used to measure the expression of these hormones in ovarian tissue.

RESULTS:

The levels of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 immunoreactivity were increased in G-VII, G-XI, and G-XII (p<0.05). The immunoreactivity of ghrelin was significantly decreased in G-VI, G-IX, G-XI, and G-XII. However, adropin immunoreactivity did not differ significantly between the groups (p>0.05). The level of irisin immunoreactivity was decreased in G-VI, G-VII, and G-VIII (p<0.05). The serum levels of NUCB2/nesfatin-1, ghrelin, adropin, and irisin paralleled the tissue immunohistochemical results.

CONCLUSION:

Carnosine and vitamin E protected the ovaries from ischemia-reperfusion injury in ovarian torsion. These antioxidants, especially carnosine, may be useful for the treatment of ovarian torsion.

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Benefits of Vitamin E Oil for Skin

Vitamin E is a wonder drug which helps to neutralize free radicals that cause damage to the cells and results in cancer, cardiovascular disease, and various other illnesses. Vitamin E oil consists of a group of eight compounds including tocotrienols and tocopherols, which can be found in many skincare products. Thus Vitamin E oil helps in skin rejuvenation and overall health with its antioxidant properties. Here are some benefits of vitamin E oil for skin when applied daily.

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