Take this vitamin to halt hair loss

In 2000, two Turkish scientists published a study in Cell Biochemistry and Function, showing a link between oxidative stress and hair loss.

By comparing the levels and activities of certain antioxidants – as well as substances indicating oxidative stress – between two groups of participants, one with hair loss and one without, the scientists found that the levels of antioxidants were significantly lower in those participants experiencing hair loss. In additon, the levels of substances showing oxidative stress were significantly higher for these participants.

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Beneficial effects of vitamin E on radioiodine induced gastrointestinal damage: an experimental and pathomorphological study

Yumusak N, Sadic M, Akbulut A, Aydinbelge FN, Koca G, Korkmaz M

Bratisl Lek Listy. 2019;120(4):263-269. doi: 10.4149/BLL_2019_048.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the present study was to investigate the radioprotective effect of vitamin E in the prevention of radioiodine (RAI) induced gastrointestinal damage.

METHOD:

Twenty-four rats were randomly divided into three groups as follows: Group-1 was untreated control group, Group-2 was orally administered single dose of 111 MBq RAI, and Group-3 was orally administered 111 MBq RAI and 1 mL of oral vitamin EVitamin E was started two days before RAI administration and was continued for five days once daily after RAI. Pathomorphological parameters of gastrointestinal tissues (stomach, small intestines and bowels) were measured using Hematoxylin-Eosin and Masson’s trichrome staining.

RESULTS:

Varying degrees of inflammation, edema, ulcer, mucosal degeneration, necrosis and fibrosis were seen in the stomach, small intestine and bowel tissues of the rats in both study groups and not in the control group. The differences were statistically significant between these groups for all parameters (p < 0.05). The histopathological damage in the vitamin E treated group was significantly less than the damage in the RAI only group (p < 0.05 for all pathomorphological parameters).

CONCLUSION:

The results of this study showed that vitamin E has a radioprotective property with antiinflammatory and antifibrotic effects protecting against gastrointestinal damage caused by radioiodine.

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Protective potential of Vitamin E against methylphenidate-induced male gonadal changes in albino rats.

Iqbal S, Hameed U, Hasan B, Zia-Ul-Islam, Ahmed M, Brohi AH

Int J Health Sci (Qassim). 2019 May-Jun;13(3):19-23.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ranks among the top neuropsychiatric disorder of childhood and adolescents. Methylphenidate (MPH) is the most frequently used pharmacologic agent to treat this condition. Its long-term use has been associated with many unwanted and adverse effects on many organs including male gonads, but so far no study has been done to find out a protective agent. This study investigated the protective potential of Vitamin E (Vit E) against the microscopic and morphometric alterations in male gonads induced by MPH, using albino rats.

METHODS:

Adult male albino rats were assigned into three equal groups including one control and two experimental groups. Experimental groups administered with MPH (10 mg/kg) and MPH (10 mg/kg) + Vit E orally (50 mg/kg), daily for 40 days. Testes of the sacrificed animals were removed, processed, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for examining the microscopic and morphometric alterations and protective potential of Vit E. Data were analyzed using ANOVA.

RESULTS:

Experimental animals treated with MPH showed a significant decrease in the diameter of seminiferous tubules (296.86 ± 14.70 µm) and height of germinal epithelium (51.73 ± 3.15 µm) with a corresponding gain in the thickness of the interstitium (47.05 ± 4.94 µm). Animals treated with MPH + Vit E did not reveal any significant testicular microscopic changes and seminiferous tubular alterations induced by MPH.

CONCLUSION:

Vit E demonstrated a protective potential against the adverse changes induced by MPH in the male gonads in albino rats.

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How to Effectively Supplement Horses With Vitamin E

Vitamin E is an essential nutrient in the equine diet, meaning horses cannot make it themselves and must consume it through their diets. Horses can easily meet this requirement with adequate access to high-quality pasture. However, vitamin E levels drop rapidly in preserved forages (think hay). And horses with decreased vitamin E levels can be at risk for developing some neuromuscular conditions. As such, owners might need to supplement this vitamin in their horses’ diets, one veterinarian and researcher said.

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Vitamin E status in healthy population in Asia: a review of current literature

Malik A, Eggersdorfer M, Trilok-Kumar G

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2019 May 24:1-14. doi: 10.1024/0300-9831/a000590. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Vitamin E is a lipid soluble antioxidant which mainly circulates as α-tocopherol in the human plasma. Its deficiency is associated with ataxia, neuropathy, anaemia and several other health conditions. Although substantial data on vitamin E status has been published worldwide, there is paucity of data on the extent of deficiency from most Asian countries, including India. Part of the problem is lack of validated biomarkers for vitamin E and no consensus on cut offs for defining deficiency and sufficiency. Thus, interpretation of the data on the vitamin E status is difficult. Limited available data from 31 studies on vitamin E status in healthy people from Asia, the most populated continent, has been collated for the purpose of this review. Broadly, the results suggest inadequate vitamin E status in most age groups, with the prevalence of deficiency reaching 67%, 80%, 56% and 72% in infants, children and adolescents, adults, elderly and pregnant women, respectively, based on varying cut offs. The findings are not surprising as both, vitamin E intakes and its status have not received too much attention in the past. Lack of conclusive data accentuates the need for more research on the vitamin E status across all age groups and to define age, gender and physiological state specific cut offs for vitamin E levels.

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Alzheimer’s disease linked with low levels of vitamin E tocotrienols and tocopherols, study says

A study has found that people with Alzheimer’s disease showed significantly lower plasmatic concentration of total tocopherols, total tocotrienols and total vitamin E (full-spectrum vitamin E consisting of all eight isoforms) compared to cognitively healthy subjects. The researchers also measured the leukocyte telomere length (LTL), which has been known to be associated with cognitive decline as well as decline in LTL with aging. The study showed the LTL is shorter in Alzheimer subjects and also that excessive nitrosylation of γ-tocopherol influences the risk of developing Alzheimer’s only in those individuals with preserved telomere length (i.e., biologically younger).

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Has vitamin E any shreds of evidence in cisplatin-induced toxicity

Hakiminia B, Goudarzi A, Moghaddas A

J Biochem Mol Toxicol. 2019 May 21:e22349. doi: 10.1002/jbt.22349. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

Cisplatin is one of the highly consumed and effective antitumor agents whose clinical application is accompanied by nephrotoxicity adverse reaction. Also, other complications such as ototoxicity and hepatotoxicity are a matter of concern. Today, it is suggested that cisplatin-associated toxicities are mainly induced by free radicals production, which will result in oxidative organ injury. The evidence is growing over the protective effects of antioxidants on cisplatin-induced adverse reactions especially nephrotoxicity. The possible protective effects of vitamin E and its derivative in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity are reviewed here at the light of pertinent results from basic and clinical research. Administration of vitamin E alone or in combination with other antioxidant agents could cause amelioration in oxidative stress biomarkers such as decreasing the level of malondialdehyde, reducing serum urea and creatinine, and also enhancing the activities of renal antioxidant enzymes including renal catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase. Although the data from most of the studies are in favors of protective effects of vitamin E against cisplatin-induced toxicity, more clinical trials are needed to clarify the clinical importance of vitamin E administration as an antioxidant during cisplatin therapy in cancer condition.

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A Prospective Study of Serum Vitamin E and 28-Year Risk of Lung Cancer

Huang J, Weinstein SJ, Yu K, Männistö S, Albanes D

J Natl Cancer Inst. 2019 May 11. pii: djz077. doi: 10.1093/jnci/djz077. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Epidemiologic data are inconsistent regarding the vitamin E-lung cancer association, and no study has examined serologic changes in vitamin E status in relation to subsequent risk.

METHODS:

In a cohort of 22,781 male smokers in the ATBC Study, we ascertained 3,184 lung cancer cases during up to 28 years of observation. Cox proportional hazards models examined whether higher serum alpha-tocopherol concentrations at baseline, 3 years, or the interval change were associated with lower lung cancer risk. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking intensity and duration, serum total cholesterol, and trial intervention group, we found lower lung cancer risk in men with high baseline alpha-tocopherol (5th quintile (Q5) vs Q1, hazard ratio (HR)=0.76, 95%CI =0.66 to 0.87; Ptrend<0.001). A similar reduction in risk was seen for serum alpha-tocopherol at 3 years (Q5 vs Q1, HR = 0.78, 95%CI =0.67 to 0.91; Ptrend=0.004). The inverse risk association appeared stronger for younger men and those having smoked fewer years, but was similar across trial intervention groups. We also found reduced risk among un-supplemented men with a lower serum alpha-tocopherol at baseline who had greater increases in concentrations at 3 years (3rd tertile vs 1st tertile of serum alpha-tocopherol change, HR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.59 to 0.91, P=0.005).

CONCLUSION:

Higher vitamin E status, as measured by serum alpha-tocopherol concentration, as well as repletion of a low vitamin E state, was related to decreased lung cancer risk during a 28-year period. Our findings provide evidence supporting the importance of adequate physiological vitamin E status for lung cancer risk reduction.

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α-Tocopherol, but Not γ-Tocopherol, Attenuates the Expression of Selective Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha-Induced Genes in Primary Human Aortic Cell Lines

Ranard KM, Kuchan MJ, Erdman JW Jr

Lipids. 2019 May;54(5):289-299. doi: 10.1002/lipd.12149. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Abstract

Of the antioxidant vitamin E isoforms, α-tocopherol (αT) and γ-tocopherol (γT) are the most abundant in the human diet, and αT is consumed from both natural and synthetic sources. αT and γT may differentially impact inflammation and influence cardiovascular outcomes, in part by modulating gene expression. The goal of this study was to compare the effects of natural αT, synthetic αT, and γT on gene expression in two human cell lines. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) and endothelial cells (HAEC) were either: (1) treated with 25 μM tocopherolsalone, or (2) pretreated with tocopherols prior to a pro-inflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, TNF-α) stimulation. The expression of atherosclerosis-related genes was measured using RT2 Profiler PCR arrays. Tocopherol treatments alone did not significantly modulate the expression of genes in unstimulated HASMC or HAEC. TNF-α stimulation significantly upregulated genes involved with apoptosis and stress response in both cell lines. Pretreating cells with tocopherols did not normalize the gene expression changes induced by TNF-α. However, αT pretreatments, but not γT pretreatments, attenuated TNF expression in both HASMC and HAEC. These findings suggest that under stimulated conditions, αT modestly modulates the expression of selective genes and that αT may be more anti-inflammatory than γT.

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Vitamin C and Vitamin E Mitigate the Risk of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma from Meat-Derived Mutagen Exposure in Adults in a Case-Control Study

Li D, Tang H, Wei P, Zheng J, Daniel CR, Hassan MM

J Nutr. 2019 May 17. pii: nxz081. doi: 10.1093/jn/nxz081. [Epub ahead of print]

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have found that meat-derived mutagens increase, and vitamin C or E decrease, the risk of pancreatic cancer.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to determine whether intake of vitamin C or E modulates the association between meat-derived mutagen exposure and risk of pancreatic cancer.

DESIGN:

We conducted a case-control study in 1321 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 1061 healthy controls (aged 28-88 y). Cases and controls were frequency-matched by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Mutagen intake was assessed using a meat preparation questionnaire. Intakes of vitamin C, E, and other dietary components were assessed via a food-frequency questionnaire in a subset of 811 cases and 818 controls. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated in multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

The risk of PDAC was not associated with meat intake but was associated with consumption of well-done grilled or barbecued chicken (OR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.18, 2.09; P = 0.001). Intake of 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline was associated with increased PDAC risk (Ptrend = 0.047). Participants in the highest, as compared with the lowest, quintile of 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (PhIP) intake experienced a 38% increased risk of PDAC (95% CI: 1.00, 1.90; P = 0.048). Intakes of total vitamin C or E from food and supplements or from supplements alone were each inversely associated with PDAC risk. Stratified analyses showed differential associations for PhIP intake and PDAC risk, such that risk increased among individuals with lower intake of vitamin C or E and decreased among those with higher vitamin intake. Significant interactions of dietary vitamin C, dietary vitamin E, and total vitamin E with PhIP intake were detected (Pinteraction = 0.023, <0.001, and 0.013, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Consistent with experimental evidence, this study of 811 cases and 818 controls has shown that high intake of dietary vitamin C or E mitigates the risk of PhIP-related PDAC.

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