Minister promotes Vitamin E in Parliament based on palm oil

Plantation Industries and Commodities Minister Datuk Mohd Khairuddin Aman Razali has encouraged Malaysians to take Vitamin E based on red palm oil — saying that it has good health benefits.

Speaking during Question Time in the Dewan Rakyat this morning, the PAS minister surprisingly backed his predecessor and DAP Seputeh lawmaker Teresa Kok, after she was teased by Jempol (BN) MP Datuk Salim Sharif.

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Tocotrienol-rich vitamin E speeds up nerve signal transmission in diabetic patients – Eight-week trial

Supplementation of tocotrienol-rich vitamin E could speed up nerve signal transmission and increase the serum level of nerve growth factor (NGF) in diabetic patients.

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Vitamin E Savior?

A new study gives hope that vitamin E may defend against catastrophic disease. The research, recently published in the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, discovered that 10 weeks of preventive use of the tocotrienol (TCT) form of vitamin E on dogs offered robust protection in the event of a stroke.

Vitamin E occurs naturally in eight forms, including tocopherols and TCTs. “Most of the previous studies on vitamin E was on tocopherols,” says lead author Chandan Sen, PhD. “Tocotrienols are hardly studied, but we found that it’s much more neural protective than the others.

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Evidence review: Micronutrient deficiencies and COVID-19

Practitioners should make micronutrient deficiencies a key consideration during the COVID-19 screening process, a recently published research review argues.

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Novel findings: Mouse study shows annatto tocotrienols may impact gut microbiota, benefit metabolic health

Tocotrienols from annatto may beneficially modify the composition of the gut microbiome and positively impact glucose homeostasis and inflammation, suggests data from a study in mice.

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Vitamins A, B, C, and E are good for your skin

Vitamins are essential for mental well-being, a strong immune system, and overall health. But it’s not all about what’s on the inside. Vitamins can also help with what’s on the outside: your skin. And if you eat right and use certain vitamin-laced skincare products, you may help prevent premature ageing skin. Here’s which vitamins can help and how.

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Form of Vitamin E Protects Brain Against Stroke

A natural form of vitamin E called alpha-tocotrienol can trigger the production of a protein in the brain that clears toxins from nerve cells, preventing those cells from dying after a stroke, according to new research appearing online in Stroke.

This natural substance, one of three mechanisms this form of vitamin E uses to protect brain cells after a stroke, may be more potent than drugs targeting single mechanisms for preventing stroke damage, according to Ohio State University scientists who have studied the nutrient for more than a decade.

These researchers previously reported that the tocotrienol form of vitamin E protects the brain after a stroke by blocking an enzyme from releasing toxic fatty acids and inhibiting the activity of a gene that can lead to neuron death.

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Danish study: The cow favors natural over synthetic vitamin E

When the dairy cow is fed grass with a naturally high vitamin E content, the milk’s content of vitamin E is higher than when the cow is primarily fed feed containing synthetic vitamin E, finds new research.

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Researchers make discoveries regarding breast milk

The main findings of this project include the following: the amount of RRR-alpha-tocopherol, a natural form of vitamin E, accounts for more than 75 percent of the total alpha-tocopherol in breast milk and umbilical cord blood; Xanthophyll is of the highest amount compared with any other carotenoid to promote fetuses’ and infants’ visual development.

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Lab insight: measuring vitamins

An interesting analytical challenge still exists for measuring vitamin E in foods. In the US, the FDA defines declarable vitamin E as alpha‑tocopherol where there is both a very bioactive naturally‑occurring form, and a less bioactive man‑made form.1 The FDA requires manufacturers to make and keep written records to verify the amount of both forms1 because there is no recognised analytical method that differentiates between the two. Until a method is developed and internationally recognised, the lab needs to have access to those records to properly calculate the amount placed in a nutritional facts panel.

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