Tocopherols and Tocotrienols (Vitamin E) – The Lipid Web

Tocopherols and tocotrienols constitute a series of related benzopyranols (or methyl tocols) that are synthesised in plants and other photosynthetic organisms, where they have many important functions. First described in 1922 as a dietary factor essential to prevent fetal reabsorption in rats, it was soon understood that they contained a vitamin (vitamin E) that is essential for innumerable aspects of animal development. Tocopherols are now known to be powerful lipid-soluble antioxidants, but only one isomer, i.e. α-tocopherol, is recognized as having vitamin E activity. In addition, this has regulatory roles in signal transduction and gene expression in animal tissues. Vegetable oils are a major dietary source.

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Foods High in Alpha-Tocopherol

Alpha-tocopherol is an alternative name for vitamin E, which has many important functions in your body. A potent antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol protects you from potentially damaging free radicals, while also boosting your immune system to help you fight off viruses and pathogenic bacteria. It also helps your body make new red blood cells and widens your blood vessels, potentially lowering your risk of developing blood clots. The best way to obtain vitamin E, according to the National Institutes of Health, is to consume vitamin E-rich foods.

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15 Top Foods That Are High In Vitamin E

Health experts recommend consuming a diet rich in vitamin E to maintain a healthy body. An average adult needs 15 mg of the vitamin to prevent its deficiency which the following food sources can provide.

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FDA’s new nutrition label regulation for fat-soluble vitamins

In 2020, FDA expects fat-soluble vitamins to be measured in metric units rather than international units as was expected in the past. Once the IU unit for vitamin E is obsolete and changed to mg of alpha-tocopherol, natural alpha-tocopherol (or d-alpha-tocopherol) will be worth twice the amount of synthetic alpha-tocopherol (or dl-alpha-tocopherol) as vitamin E.

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Effects of Vitamin E more diverse than thought

At the University of Innsbruck, a pharmacy team has been inquiring about normal items for their anti-inflammatory impacts for quite a while. The investigations will be done together with a worldwide consortium with the cooperation of scientists from Germany, France, and Italy. In these investigations, information rose that indicated vitamin E and related structures as an on-screen character in the inflammatory procedure.

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Vitamin E: Sources, Benefits & Risks

Vitamin E is a vital nutrient for good health, and it’s found in a wide variety of foods and supplements. The best way to consume this vitamin is through a healthy diet. Deficiency is rare, and overdosing by using supplements is a concern. Those who have certain health conditions or take certain medicines should be cautious with supplements.

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Is vitamin E good for your hair?

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble nutrient that is available from several food sources as well as in supplement form. Some people believe that vitamin E has a positive impact on hair health, although more research is necessary to support this theory.

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